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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
. right now it's 65 at b.w.i. marshall, 68 downtown at the science center. we also see in addition to the rain coming up from the south all that tropical moisture. we see the rains out associated with that cool front out in western pennsylvania and west virginia. now, this may eventually, once the storm matures, starts coming in and everything else, there's cold air back there. this may be snow by tuesday and not rain, all right? so this is why really it's sandy and it was a hurricane, or is now, but when it comes in here it's going to be a nor'easter, and they do other things. let's take a look at the current temperatures outside right now. a mild day, 66 at annapolis, 63 easton. also on the boardwalk on the ocean city, chestertown 67, westminster and parkton, 63. 64 at frederick and in the low to mid 50's in far western maryland. shades of blue out here. 40's are beginning to filter in. they're kind of sitting out there parked and waiting, so to speak, with that cool front, which really has stalled out right now. i mean, they're kind of battling, these guys, this storm here. the
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. so, which supeast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. >> at 25 minutes past the hour, i am updating you on super storm sandy, leaving people without power. the death toll is 18. travel is at a standstill as most major tunnels and bridges to and from the city remained closed. new york and new jersey officials said water damaged trains and buses could keep most of the system shut down for days. as a whole, more than 15,000 flights have been canceled due to the store. also here in new york, authorities are trying to figure out how to secure a construction crane that is dangling atop a high-rise. thous
technology and science, you can't find one instance, there is no such exception as life of the mother and as far as health of the mother, the same thing. congratulations, ladies. thanks to modern technology and science, we are immortal. oh, and of course we can't forget richard candidate who said this. >> i believe life begins at exception. the only exception an abortion is in that case of the life of the mother. i just struggled with it myself for a long time, you but life is that gift from god and even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that god intended to happen. >> we're all impressed with his struggle with that for a long time and i've already said what i've had to say with mr. mourdock. but this week, todd akin became a cautionary tale nuking his campaign by uttering the words legitimate rape, but let's and he not make it sound like these guys are the fringe of the republican party, but just less articulate. vice presidential nominee paul ryan once voted to redefine rape for the purposes of restricting an bourpgs rights and he also co-spon
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this strong dollar is the culprit. it stayed strong. it's up at about a one-month high against the euro. that has pushed gold down 2% today. crude oil down 2% today. stocks have gone with it as well. very quickly on the sectors for the week. again, i call this the sandy effect. the strength was in basic materials. now everybody's lower right now. so for the week, we are seeing minus signs across the board. let's bring in ben willis. what do you make of this late selloff and why we're going down today? >> well, it's a perversion of wall street f you will. the fact of the matter is the economic data is pointing to such great strength that that gives the idea that the fed will back away from the easy money policy that's been in place. the twist will expire. et cetera, et cetera. that's driving up the dollar. the commodity based dollars are trading lower. so you had gold come off. you had oil come off. they also broke support levels, or 85 level on the west texas intermediate. they fed on themselves.
at the science of shopping with consumer dos and don'ts. >> dpoork. >> is there really a science to shopping for big-ticket items. >> a new study out of brigham young university and emorie university, if you're shopping for a big-ticket item like a big-screen tv, you shouldn't focus on the price. people who did spent 50% more. you're much better off thinking about what attributes do i want this product to have, whether it's a diamond ring or a big-screen tv, how big do i want it to be? what kind of resolution do i need it to have? do i want it to be a smart tv and then you can find one of those with all those attributes at the lowest price, works better. >> seems like the best of those things with those attributes would have the biggest price, is that necessarily true? >> not necessarily in items like big-korean tvs where we're seeing a lot of them under $1,000. >> let's talk about how to go about it. starting with popular books and something you call save on where we get great deals. >> we're going to break you some great deals. these come from retail me not and led us to those deals. the f
now, sprinkles here and there, no big deal. 59 at the airport and 62 at the maryland science center. a breezy day today but strongest coming in tomorrow, winds staying between 10 and 20 miles per hour during the day today. temperatures won't move much, upper 60's, -- upper 50's, low 60's. i've plotted some of the strongest wind guests as of the last hour. winds gusting close to 40 at the beach later on today and ava marie is down there. radar picking up heavy rain, outer bands of the storm that's way down to our south but along the delaware line on the eastern shore, heavy rain going on. sprinkles around baltimore and i suspect it will stay that way the next couple of hours but heavier rain shifting towards baltimore later today. here's the latest satellite imagery on sandy, a healthy looking storm, nice banding features, wrapping around the center so sustained winds still 75 miles per hour and it is technically still a hurricane. it's a few hundred miles off the coast of the carolinas. this is a gigantic storm with a huge wind field, 400 to 500 miles across. we will get into it eit
well this is clearly climate change now. this is not how science works. >> you can't point to one storm, because there've been serious storms historically in the past. but, i think it's also undeniable that our climate is changing. i mean, science has proven that. i mean, overall, so i think that it's undeniable that what we are doing as people to the environment is changing the way our climate impacts us. and we're going to have to take this very seriously. and that's why it's important that government acts responsibly to regulate environmental issues. >> richard socarides, will cain. thanks for coming in this morning. >> still ahead, the travel chaos caused by sandy. so much of it, one major new york airport still under water. >> can you believe it? look at that. >> cnn's richard quest will have all of that information for us and what you can look for today. >> and when will it reopen, right? >> will it reopen? you're watching "early start." r. double miles you can actually use... but mr. single miles can't join his friends because he's getting hit with blackouts. shame on you. now he
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
it said redaction is then made. and we often found that this was not a science. someone said this morning, it was a mathematical. it is hard. and you will have people disagree even within the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. we would get very significant reductions. give it to another person, much less significant, and it would argue with each other as to what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply with a broad stroke redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why it would harm the national security which is the standard. by pushing back the information in the public that it turned out to be was not able to be released and give the public and insight on what was happening within the agency. inside having access and permission we have the ability and roll that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government because you know what is happening within the agency. you know where the bodies are buried. you know how th
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
even the after with political reform. that our science the other element elements in national community they are getting weary of this conflict. the turks i think are a little weary right now. there've been some comments even from the obama administration, shifting from the manichaean view towards assad. so all of these scenarios don't present too much of a pretty picture, and, obviously, lead to more death and destruction in the near term but, unfortunately, there are no easy answers to this. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. we have two respondents. we have paul sullivan, professor of economics, national defense university as was agenda professor in the security studies program at georgetown university. will ask and become first and then lastly we'll have ambassador take the tooth, president and ceo of america-mideast education and training. spent i have not been more torn of the situation were longtime that the situation in syria. this is a serious business. now, when people mentioned soft power, i think there may be some of get the impression that this is having peace on
. and this is why i love the pollsters. they try to apply science and data that predict. we're talk about human beings. and human behavior is unpredictable. we can have a sense of what we think is going to happen. the numbers i've been looking at are some of the early vote numbers. for example if you look at some of of these battle ground states and the number of people who have already voted early, the percentages that mitt romney will have to get of the remaining vote, the math is pretty tough. >> in some of those battle ground states they're saying that election day seems to have the headwind behind mitt romney. >> it could. the point is we don't know. and as tony knows, early voters to some degree that's a different universe. we've talked about this before. that's a different universe of voters than necessarily the people that vote on election day so we don't know. >> go ahead, tony. >> you never know. the great benefit for early voters for any campaign if you've ever worked in a campaign, the great benefit of early voters you can forget about them. you don't have to concentrate your fire p
that this is not a science. so and of this work it wasn't mathematical. it is in part. and you'll have people disagreeing come even within the agency, about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. you give it to one person and for sample in the fbi, the report, and we would get a very significant reduction. would give it to another person, much less significant redactions and they would argue with each other as what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with a broad strokes, redacted all sorts of information from the report, that they need to justify why would harm national security, which is the standard after all. by pushing back we often got much information out in the public that it turned out wasn't able to be released into the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. and maybe that thing with any agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government. because you know w
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. home depot stores in the northeast helping people protect and repair their property after super storm sandy. and joining us is home depot's northern division president runs 800 stores across 22 states. and i imagine you have not had an opportunity to sleep over the past couple of days. >> well, first of all, thank you for having me on this morning. last couple of days have been interesting. our first intention was to figure out the damage across the knead and see how we can help our customers. >> what's open? what's not? >> so as of ri
is what happened with that coverup in benghazi. you know, they said early there were no warning science. we have, at this network chronicled between half a dozen and a dozen of them. here another one, looks like a smoking gun a secret cable that said they had this emergency meeting three weeks before those guys were murdered. you know what? the consulate not safe. we should probably go ahead and hide out over at the cia outp away. nobody did anything. >> no, they didn't. there ought to be a pulitzer prize for catherine herridge and jennifer griffin at staff at fox news they have done yo men's work to get the truth out. >> first to say the government lied to us and now they are covering it up. it's becoming more clear every day. clear danger in benghazi. indication that the reason that the ambassador went there really secretly and quietly because he knew it was a treacherous place to be. why we haven't admitted that the only thing you can imagine is that we just don't want to admit that, you know, bin laden may be dead. but al qaeda is very much alive. it's the ambassador who is dead. do
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)